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Tikal

Tikal is about an hour bus ride from El Remate. Like most of the mayan ruins you can hire a tour guide or go about it on your own. One of the options for having a tour guide was the sunrise tour. The bus picks you up at three thirty in the morning and you hike to temple four and watch the sunrise from above the canopy. Sounds pretty amazing but sleep was more enticing after the long bus ride the day before. The Canadian girls who checked in the same time as us opted to take the sunrise tour and I was eager to hear about how it went. We scheduled a ride for ten o’clock.

Camera batteries charged and water bottles filled we crammed into the already full micro bus headed for Tikal. Being the only gringos aboard was nothing new but it was a little awkward when we had to stop and pay our twenty-dollar entrance fee. The locals waited patiently as we fumbled around mixing and matching our quetzals (come to find out they do not take U.S. dollars) luckily we had enough of the local currency to pay our way through. There is no grand entrance like at Coba or Chichen Itza. The bus dropped us off in a little round about area and we started our trek into the jungle.

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We didn’t make it far before coming across a massive Ceiba tree that towers two hundred and thirty feet over head! The Mayans believed that these trees held up the sky. After gawking for quite some time we made our way up the trail. We came to a map of the area as well as a fork in the trail. We took a right and headed for the plaza area. Not knowing we would run into a few temples along the way. As we came up on the plaza it was hard to tell how large it really was. I climbed up the stairs leading up a large structure, wound my way through the ancient stone and BAM there it was, the Grand Plaza in all its glory! Temple one to my left, temple two on the right, and the North Acropolis straight across the plaza.

IMG_2686Standing inside The Grand Plaza, looking around and up at the massive temple gives me an eerie feeling. Like someone or something is watching, just waiting to unveil itself. As I leave the plaza to head up another trail towards temple four I look up. There are two spider monkeys in the trees. Of course, a hoard of tourist is snapping a million photos. As I start back into the jungle I can hear what sounds like a recording of some crazy animal. I am convinced the park has speakers and are playing odd sounds for us so that our tour seems more authentic. Come to find out it was no recording. The sound was that of the Howler monkey. Supposedly the loudest land animal in the world. Had I not heard this terrifying screech myself I would probably not believe that statement, however, I have heard it, and I do believe it is true. The sound is hard to describe in words so I encourage you to make your own trip into the jungle to hear the monkeys mockery.

IMG_2804Temple four is massive. It rises up through the canopy and looms over all of Tikal. From the top I can see three other temples down below. The view is stunning and I can’t imagine what it would have been like at sunrise. As we head down the rickety stairway we run into the two Canadians who did the sunrise tour. Well, turns out they actually did NOT do the tour! They explain that they were waiting for the bus outside the hotel at three am…then four am… then around five they said screw it and went back to sleep! They were not particularly happy about this but they were still enjoying themselves nonetheless. WHEW, glad I didn’t book that tour!

The ruins of Tikal are supernatural and I can’t begin to explain the energy I felt there. The vastness of the grounds is astonishing and the sheer size of the temples is mind-blowing. I spent four hours wandering the trails of Tikal and could have spent another two. I am glad I did not hire a tour guide. From what I can tell when you have a tour guide it seems rather rushed, I would prefer to take my time and stop where I want. Having a book on the subject or doing some light reading previous to your own tour will provide just as much knowledge as any “multi-lingual” tour guide.

 

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